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View Full Version : How much Loft is too much?



BearClaw1973
03-13-2010, 07:22 PM
Hello new guy again,
I practiced today and have a question. I`ve really been working on my release lately. I wear a wrist support to keep my wrist from breaking back but still seem to drive the ball down with a spin like you would a Top. I worked on it and found that if I don't get as low in my release I can rotate properly getting better rotation. Problem is I end up lofting the ball a little. I know a little Loft is good but how much is "a little". I can target better, don't pull the ball and actually Bowled four strikes in a row after figuring this out. I don't want to do anything improper or damage anything. One time I KNOW it was to much "loud thud:eek:" so is there a unwritten rule of thumb so to speak as to length of Loft. Thank you for your time.

WAC4504
03-13-2010, 07:39 PM
There's no rule that I know of, and the moor you bowl the moor comfortable you will get with it. I usually put it out about 4 ft. I'd say.

Strike Domination
03-13-2010, 07:50 PM
Maybe my definition of loft is different than others, I'm not sure, but loft to me is how much the ball goes in the air off the ground. Not length the ball travels before it hits the lane. So how much air are you getting and how far onto the lane does your ball land?

After watching one of my team mates for a while now, I've been trying to understand why he's able to have the success he does. He averages over 200 in our league, sometimes 210+. His ball does not hit the lane until around the arrows, most likely a little further. I thought that was a crazy amount of loft. But his ball does not make a very loud thud, and his ball is 2-3 feet over the lane. I think it's because his ball travels parallel to the lane most of the time. Now an older fellow in our league lofts the ball in the air about 4 feet I think, but it only lands a little passed the dots before the arrows. His ball makes a really loud thud because his ball's angle into the lane is steeper.

Just food for thought I guess.

Motiv Girl
03-13-2010, 08:10 PM
If you're setting the ball down onto the lane 18 inches over the foul line, you could make the lane hook less for you by lofting the ball farther down the lane. This may mean learning to get the ball six to 10 feet out on the lane. To do this, hang on to the ball a little longer near the release point. When you accomplish this, you'll notice that the ball will go farther down the lane before it hooks.

bowl1820
03-13-2010, 08:17 PM
LOFT: The distance the ball travels between time of release and the time it hits the lane.

The long lofts of today are a product of today's lane conditions and the powerful balls. Back in the day you laid a ball on the lane like landing a airplane, Nice and smooth. Most houses had signs up "No lofting" but as conditions changed so did lofting.

But a old training tip for a acceptable amount of loft, was to lay a bowling towel on the lane just past the foul line. the ball should just pass over the towel and land just pass the other side without touching the towel.


Also if you need to loft a ball 6-10-15 feet down the lane your using the wrong ball. It might work, but you shouldn't have to be doing it.

BearClaw1973
03-13-2010, 08:32 PM
Thanks for all the replys. I would say from my hand to where it hit on the lane was about three to four feet. Not a loud thud at that distance. Like I said once I did make it go a bit future and its was too much but the distance I came out with was three or so feet. I still need to work on this like I say I figured this out today and Bowled two or three games afterwards. I can say this, I did have to change my angle because I was getting a lot more revs and hook. I`ll work on this more in the next day or two. Thanks again.

randwool
03-18-2010, 01:26 PM
I would be curious as to the weight of the ball in question. Isn't there a trade-off between ball weight and overpowering a normal pendulum swing using too light a ball causing extra loft?

Graaille
03-18-2010, 07:44 PM
I'm thinking that if the first thing the ball touches after it leaves your hands are the pins or the celing, then you have too much loft.

BearClaw1973
03-18-2010, 08:17 PM
I would be curious as to the weight of the ball in question. Isn't there a trade-off between ball weight and overpowering a normal pendulum swing using too light a ball causing extra loft?

Its a 15lb Columbia Freeze. Honestly it seems plenty heavy for me. I`m getting frustrated because I haven't found anything that really works for me just yet. I think most all of it is my release. I want to be able to cup the ball somewhat so I can get better rotation but I don't seem to have the strength to do it. I consider myself a big strong guy but I cant seem to grasp the release with any repeat success. I was a amateur musician for many years "6 string electric bass and Double Bass" in the Nashville area. I`ve had wrist problems sense. I wear a wrist support but this doesnt let me cup the ball like I want. I guess I just need shut up and practice and It will come to me.:rolleyes: Thanks

randwool
03-18-2010, 09:10 PM
Might be worth having the Pro Shop guy look at your swing, release, and ball setup, if you haven't already.

BearClaw1973
03-18-2010, 09:52 PM
I have had a lesson and hes also just come out to give pointers also. I put some tape in the thumb hole and that did help a good bit. I ended up putting two in. It did help me hold on better and I wasent driving the ball into the lane. I think the ball we just leaving my hand early. I come home and order that Magic Carpet I`ve seen on Ron Clifton`s site thinking it might help. I`ll try anything now. With two stripps of tape the ball still seemed a little loose. Now understand this is coming from a newbee and it may be just me looking for an excuse. I`m going to give it a little while longer and if I`m not getting the results I want I`ll have another lesson to fix this. Thanks again

Beech
03-19-2010, 12:43 AM
i think if you throw the ball past the arrows on the lane something isnt right. thats just my oppinon, i have somewhat of a loft but its not big its just about 3feet max. I know my teamate in juniors could loft it 3/4 down the lane and make it bounch atleast 4 noticable times which is insane for a 14lbs ball at the time

JAnderson
03-26-2010, 06:15 PM
How tall are you BC? Taller bowlers with less knee bend generally have a release point more distant from the floor.

If you can get video of yourself from a side view, look to see if the ball is released at an upward angle. That's generally** undesirable as it creates a more unpredictable ball reaction down the lane. From the side, the ball and swing should look like you're landing a plane: not nose-diving into the runway but not trying to land with the back wheels down and the nose in the air either.

** - For most lane conditions. There are always exceptions.

bowl1820
03-27-2010, 09:33 PM
just happened on this one-

Don't "loft" the ball: lofting is when you hurl the ball 20 feet forward before it lands on the lane. This can dent the lane and rattle teeth. You want to roll the ball, not throw it.

BearClaw1973
03-27-2010, 09:51 PM
Thanks for the replys. I`m 6ft tall and to be honest its not really a long loft upward. I practiced again today and its really about three feet or so downward because I don't get low in my release. I talked to the House Pro "my teacher" today after practice and were going to set up another lesson soon. He says I have a timing issue we need to work on and I also want to stay under the ball more but thats my problem strength wise. After I left the Bowling Center I went and purchased a 20lb dumbbell to work with. Theres a League starting in May and IM GOING to be ready;). Thanks again for the advice.

Motiv Girl
04-21-2010, 07:57 PM
And update on the smaller posted I had earlier on this subject.

If the ball or lane is hooking early, there are several items to check. The first is where you are playing on the lane. You can divide the lane into three sections: the heads (about the first 18 feet), the pines (the middle portion of the lane, front to back), and the back ends (about the last 15 to 20 feet). Generally there is more oil as you move in toward the center of the lane, so if the ball hooks too early from where you're playing, you may want to move to a line farther inside.

Sometimes, though, even when you move more toward the center of the lane, the ball still hooks too early, so the next item to check is your ball choice. The cover of the bowling ball is the major factor in ball reaction. If the cover is too aggressive for a certain condition--especially dry heads--you will not be able to get the ball down the lane before it starts to hook. In this instance, it would be a good choice to switch to a less aggressive cover stock to get the ball down the lane.

If the lane hooks all the way down, there are other options that will help you to control the hook. Fine-tuning your ball choice with respect not only to the cover stock but core construction and layout can help. When the lanes hook, you may want a less aggressive core and a milder layout. Talk with your pro shop operator for his suggestions.

Lofting the ball out may also be a great option for you. When you do this, the lane will seem shorter. For instance, if you're setting the ball down onto the lane 18 inches over the foul line, you could make the lane hook less for you by lofting the ball farther down the lane. This may mean learning to get the ball six to 10 feet out on the lane. To do this, hang on to the ball a little longer near the release point. When you accomplish this, you'll notice that the ball will go farther down the lane before it hooks.

Another option is to use more ball speed, which will help get the ball farther down the lane before it hooks. The best way to generate more speed is to make your overall motion to the foul line faster, more uptempo. Your mechanics should remain the same, but your motion will be more aggressive, and being more aggressive with your body motion will translate into more ball speed at the release.

Additionally, you may want to back off on the strength of your release, because if your hand and wrist are in very strong positions it will be difficult for you to get the ball down a hooking lane. By backing off your hand position--relaxing your wrist a little and uncocking your hand in your stance, and leaving them that way throughout your approach and release area--you can get the ball down the lane much more easily. The more you cup and cock your wrist, the more strongly you're loading your releas If the ball or lane is hooking early, there are several items to check. The first is where you are playing on the lane. You can divide the lane into three sections: the heads (about the first 18 feet), the pines (the middle portion of the lane, front to back), and the back ends (about the last 15 to 20 feet). Generally there is more oil as you move in toward the center of the lane, so if the ball hooks too early from where you're playing, you may want to move to a line farther inside.

Sometimes, though, even when you move more toward the center of the lane, the ball still hooks too early, so the next item to check is your ball choice. The cover of the bowling ball is the major factor in ball reaction. If the cover is too aggressive for a certain condition--especially dry heads--you will not be able to get the ball down the lane before it starts to hook. In this instance, it would be a good choice to switch to a less aggressive cover stock to get the ball down the lane.

If the lane hooks all the way down, there are other options that will help you to control the hook. Fine-tuning your ball choice with respect not only to the cover stock but core construction and layout can help. When the lanes hook, you may want a less aggressive core and a milder layout. Talk with your pro shop operator for his suggestions.

Lofting the ball out may also be a great option for you. When you do this, the lane will seem shorter. For instance, if you're setting the ball down onto the lane 18 inches over the foul line, you could make the lane hook less for you by lofting the ball farther down the lane. This may mean learning to get the ball six to 10 feet out on the lane. To do this, hang on to the ball a little longer near the release point. When you accomplish this, you'll notice that the ball will go farther down the lane before it hooks.

Another option is to use more ball speed, which will help get the ball farther down the lane before it hooks. The best way to generate more speed is to make your overall motion to the foul line faster, more uptempo. Your mechanics should remain the same, but your motion will be more aggressive, and being more aggressive with your body motion will translate into more ball speed at the release.

Additionally, you may want to back off on the strength of your release, because if your hand and wrist are in very strong positions it will be difficult for you to get the ball down a hooking lane. By backing off your hand position--relaxing your wrist a little and uncocking your hand in your stance, and leaving them that way throughout your approach and release area--you can get the ball down the lane much more easily. The more you cup and cock your wrist, the more strongly you're loading your release. So the more you uncup or break your wrist and uncock your hand, the easier it will be to get the ball down the lane. These adjustments for hooking lanes can make a difference in how successful you are and will allow you to be more versatile when the lanes call for it.

So the more you uncup or break your wrist and uncock your hand, the easier it will be to get the ball down the lane. These adjustments for hooking lanes can make a difference in how successful you are and will allow you to be more versatile when the lanes call for it.

DanielMareina
04-22-2010, 11:55 AM
As a pro shop guy and bowling coach, loft is not a good or bad thing. The key is to learn to not use it until it is needed. The problem with using it all the time, is that it is hard to have it go exactly the same distance all the time. A little extra distance means that the ball has less time on the lane to react, therefore causing inconsistent reaction. Lofting is a very good thing to know how to do though. If you ever bowl a 10 game block on a house pattern, or bowl after a lot of open bowling, the head oil can be scarce. The way to get past the burnt head oil is to loft the ball over it. One thing you can listen for is whether the ball thumps twice or just once. If the ball hits the lane (thump number one) and then bounces and hits the lane again (thump #2) it is not a good thing. You want the ball to make contact with the lane smoothly enough that you don't double bounce. Double bouncing can occur from dropping the ball early or releasing the ball late. Either way, it throws the roll of your ball off, and will lead to inconsistent reaction. I hope this helps you. Good luck on a five bagger next time :)

Jord_84
04-22-2010, 08:12 PM
I read this, and the first thing that popped into my head was....."If you're breaking something when the ball hits the lane...then you've probably got too much loft." lol

I know that doesn't help lol

If you're trying to get the ball out farther though, take one of your towels, and lay it out on the other side of the foul line. This will help you because you'll consciously be trying to hold onto the ball for longer to avoid hitting the towel.