Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12
Results 11 to 15 of 15

Thread: Struggling to Increase Ball Speed

  1. #11
    Pin Crusher
    Join Date
    Sep 2015
    Location
    Dearborn Mi
    Posts
    1,398
    Chats: 0

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by bowlingwebster View Post
    This has been a big problem for me. I have tried moving my feet faster, stepping back further, all while trying to keep a smooth swing without forcing it. Right now with one hand, being left handed, my speed is around 12 mph. I struggle with consistency hitting the pocket because my speed is to slow, and It over hooks due to the slower speed.

    When I get my speed up to 14-15 mph throwing 2 handed, my ball has great reaction.

    What would be the cause for the slower speed? I have even tried holding the ball lower and I actually have a fairly long backswing as well. Any tips would be great.

    thanks
    Maybe a little more information would get you some better answers.
    First how old are you?
    Are you male or female?
    Are you tall of short?
    What do you weigh?
    Do you have any physical problems?
    Everyone is different.
    If you are a 12 year old girl who weighs 80 lbs. vrs. a 6 foot man who weighs 220 that might make a difference on the answer.
    GO SEE A CERTIFIED COACH WHO CAN WATCH YOU BOWL.
    Thank you.

  2. #12

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by RobLV1 View Post
    Go to the USBC website, www.bowl.com, and look under "Find a.... Coach" in your area.
    Thanks Rob as I did that. Im amazed at how many there are, but simply just have their names with no information to contact them. Is there a way around contacting them if it is just their name? I see a few level 2 and bronzes in my area. Just no information to call them.

  3. #13

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by fordman1 View Post
    Maybe a little more information would get you some better answers.
    First how old are you?
    Are you male or female?
    Are you tall of short?
    What do you weigh?
    Do you have any physical problems?
    Everyone is different.
    If you are a 12 year old girl who weighs 80 lbs. vrs. a 6 foot man who weighs 220 that might make a difference on the answer.
    GO SEE A CERTIFIED COACH WHO CAN WATCH YOU BOWL.
    Thank you.
    Great point on giving more information.

    Im 33
    Male
    5'10
    170 pds
    no physical problems on my left side, as im left handed.
    I currently locating a higher level coach once I can find information on them besides just a name.

    Hopefully some of those answers can help me get better ones. Thanks.

  4. #14
    Super Moderator
    bowl1820's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    Central, Florida
    Posts
    6,331
    Blog Entries
    12
    Chats: 554

    Default

    Heres two old posts that might help

    Quote Originally Posted by Tampabaybob View Post
    Here's another tip that may help you:

    CONTROL YOUR ROLL INCREASING/DECREASING BALL SPEED
    By Bryan O’Keefe

    Bowling is about the ability to repeat shots and the readi- ness to adjust to changing conditions.
    Today, we have bowling balls that absorb oil and we compete on an invisible playing field that changes with virtually every shot that goes down the lane. Bowlers need to con- stantly adjust to those changes.
    Too often bowlers immediately feel the need to adjust by moving on the approach, left-to-right across the lane. Remember, the lane is 60 feet long but only 39 inches wide. There’s much more room to make front-to-back than left-to-right adjust- ments. Sometimes the best adjust- ment is stay on the same line and
    simply increase or decrease the ball speed to better read the changes in the lane. If you need the ball to slow down faster, throw it slower. If you need the ball to not slow down quite as quickly, throw it faster.
    Of course, increasing and decreasing ball speed is not a new concept in bowling, but the manner in which people attempt to adjust their ball speed is the subject of con- siderable debate.
    One misconception is that you can adjust your ball speed by using your upper body. It’s a mistake to think that you can keep your lower body the same and simply use more muscle to throw the ball harder, or slow the ball down by grabbing it more and forcing yourself to throw the ball slower. In truth, you may

    “The best way to increase or decrease ball speed is by using your legs, not your upper body.“

    In truth, you may actually accomplish faster or slower ball speed, but your accuracy and consistency is going to be very difficult to repeat.
    The best way to increase or de- crease ball speed is by using your legs, not your upper body. Using your lower body to adjust your tem- po to the line will allow you to main- tain a fluid, natural swing and will greatly increase your ability to repeat shots.
    To increase ball speed, start your approach a step behind your normal starting point, which will give you more room so that you can walk faster. By moving faster to the line, your stride will be slightly longer. That extra pace to the line will get your lower body working while your upper body stays relaxed and ball speed will still increase.
    Conversely, if you want to decrease your ball speed, move up a foot in your approach. Whether you’re using a four-step or five-step approach, your steps will be shorter and your pace will be slower.
    Naturally, a byproduct of quicker/ slower tempo to the line is that your timing must adjust with the tempo, and that’s where the biggest misconception about adjusting ball speed comes in.
    Prevailing wisdom suggests that in order to throw the ball harder you start the ball higher (lengthening your swing), and to slow it down you start the ball lower in your stance (shortening your swing).
    By adjusting your tempo to the line, the opposite is actually true. Start with the ball about six inches lower if you want to increase ball speed, and start with the ball slightly higher if you want to decrease
    ball speed. Confused?

    Here’s how it works: By speeding up your tempo to the line, you’ve actually got less time to get the ball from your stance, through your swing and to the release point. Let’s say your normal swing takes four sec- onds from stance to release point. There’s a natural tempo, so your feet are instinctively going to keep track of that to keep you in your timing. Now, if you cut your swing to 3.5 seconds, your feet are going to move faster to stay in synch.
    It’s all about the distance your swing travels. If you take a shorter swing, your feet automatically have to go faster in order to stay in time.
    In essence, your feet have to move faster to make up for the lost distance in your swing. If your swing is longer, your feet have to move slower to maintain proper timing.
    So, to increase ball speed, move back one foot on the approach and adjust the ball position six inches lower in your stance. To decrease ball speed, start one foot forward on the approach and position the ball six inches higher in your stance.
    To a certain extent, the distance of your swing dictates your foot speed. Adjusting the length of the swing shorter or longer than normal will allow you to increase or decrease ball speed.
    That can come in handy because often times you’re on the right part of the lane. Instead of moving left or right, adjust your ball speed to adapt to the changing lane conditions.
    — Bryan O’Keefe is Assistant Coach and Facility Manager at the International Training and Research Center in Arlington, Texas.

    Again, there are many ways to do this and Brian is one of the outstanding coaches in the US. Try it and see if it helps.

    Bob
    Here's a post I made to go with that.

    There's a old book "Bowling: Knowledge is Key" by Fred Borden in it there's a part where he talks about "vertical placement" (Holding the ball higher or lower).

    In it he talks about not holding it higher or lower to increase or decrease speed. But use it as a way of controlling arm swing timing to match the tempo of your feet movements. Raising the ball retards the arm swing in relation to the feet movement, lowering the ball advances the arm swing timing in relation to the feet movements

    So Bowlers with a naturally fast tempo, hold the ball lower to match up with their footwork. Those with a slower tempo, hold the ball higher because it retards the swing.

    Now if holding the ball higher retards the swing, that would mean it would be basically a longer, slower swing. And so the higher you hold it, the longer and slower the swing be.

    Now if your trying to increase speed , using a longer and slower swing wouldn't help. You would wind up having to accelerate your arm through that longer, slower swing. Not only To make up for the speed you lost with the longer swing, but to get that extra speed you wanted in the first place. That would mean adding muscle to the swing, but muscling isn't something we want to do.

    Now if you increase or decrease speed using foot work (as Bryan O'Keefe's article suggests). then using a lower ball height for faster and higher one for slower makes makes sense, because it's just matching up the swing timing with the foot work. Plus you can still have a free swing, with no muscles involved to increase the speed.

    It just seemed to me that you could infer from Fred's idea above, that if you wanted to increase ball speed by faster footwork. You would have to hold the ball lower. And that is the basic idea put forth by Bryan O'Keefe's article. Increase ball speed by holding ball lower with faster footwork. Hold higher with slower footwork for slower ball speed. So to me it would seem to support Bryan's idea.

    It's kind of a old idea, now new again.
    But how do I find a default position?
    The "default position" would be where you normally start off at and could be different for everyone.

    Most of the time in bowling the classic starting point is with the ball at waist height, forearm parallel to the floor. You would then go from there, seeing if you need to raise or lower the ball in your stance.

    Right handed Stroker, high track ,about 13 degree axis tilt. PAP is located 5 9/16” over 1 3/4” up.Speed ave. about 14 mph at the pins. Medium rev’s.High Game 300, High series 798

    "Adjust too soon and maybe ruin one frame, adjust too late and ruin a game."

  5. #15

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by bowl1820 View Post
    Heres two old posts that might help



    Here's a post I made to go with that.





    The "default position" would be where you normally start off at and could be different for everyone.

    Most of the time in bowling the classic starting point is with the ball at waist height, forearm parallel to the floor. You would then go from there, seeing if you need to raise or lower the ball in your stance.

    Thats some great stuff. Ok now that is well said and makes sense for me. So faster foot speed, along with a low ball location would help me activate my lower body. That is exactly what I trying to figure out how to do without feeling like I was muscling or swinging harder with my arms. Im excited to take this into practice and see if I can get faster footwork with proper tempo, that I can start to see if my speed can pick up. Because im naturally athletic, but after reading that article, I did hold the ball higher with a fairly long backswing, and since i have a free flowing swing i didnt muscle it, resulting in my slow speed.

    Im excited to try this out and crossing fingers I can at least get my ball speed up to 15 mphs and build from there.

    Thanks for articles and help. All of this is great. Im also still searching for a coach, hate that they dont put their contact info in though.

Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •