Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 123 LastLast
Results 11 to 20 of 23

Thread: Bowling Today; Any Tips For Improving?

  1. #11

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by boatman37 View Post
    I agree with the coach suggestion but I don't agree with working on your straight game before trying to hook. If you want to throw a hook learn it now. Might be hard with a plastic ball but I think getting good with one thing will make it harder to switch when you decide to.
    Don't you need to learn to bowl both ways to be good, though? If the horrid ten pin is left, the righthanded bowlers I have seen must bowl straight to get it. Usually people start easy and work their way up, and since I have a plastic ball anyway it seemed like the natural way to go for me. You don't think so?

  2. #12

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by J Anderson View Post
    I have never seen a young person who started with a straight ball who wasn’t able to learn to throw a hook. Most of the time kids switch from straight to hook and then can’t make a ten pin because even their plastic ball hooks.
    What is your opinion? Should I learn to hook now, or work on my aim bowling straight first?

  3. #13

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by MajorPhoenix View Post
    Once my players understand the basics of form and have a good feel for their approach, then I recommend moving up to a straight ball.
    I already have form and footing down pat. Those were some of the first things I learned, and I think I learned them well. I am bowling with a straight plastic ball. Do you think I should improve my straight game, or learn to hook now?

  4. #14

    Default

    The difference between going to a trained coach and getting help from high average bowlers is that the coach will teach you the accepted standards of good bowling; the things that you need to develop your own successful style. Untrained "coaches" will try to teach you to bowl like they do. What works for one person does not work for another, and may in fact be limiting to the person learning. It's easy to say that you are unable to work with a certified coach right now, but find a way to do it. You have a long bowling life in front of you. You can start out on the right foot or the wrong foot (pun intended). It's up to you. The above discussion of a straight game vs. learning to hook the ball is a perfect example of the dangers of talking to untrained coaches.

  5. #15

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by RobLV1 View Post
    The difference between going to a trained coach and getting help from high average bowlers is that the coach will teach you the accepted standards of good bowling; the things that you need to develop your own successful style. Untrained "coaches" will try to teach you to bowl like they do. What works for one person does not work for another, and may in fact be limiting to the person learning. It's easy to say that you are unable to work with a certified coach right now, but find a way to do it. You have a long bowling life in front of you. You can start out on the right foot or the wrong foot (pun intended). It's up to you. The above discussion of a straight game vs. learning to hook the ball is a perfect example of the dangers of talking to untrained coaches.
    No, I actually cannot get a coach at this point in time. The reasons are many, but they are personal so I do not care to get into them. I want to thank you for your input, but a certified coach is not in the picture at this point. Perhaps some day in the future.

  6. #16
    High Roller
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Connecticut
    Posts
    2,920
    Chats: 13

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by J Daisy View Post
    I am unable to get a certified coach at this time, but I certainly agree that it is good to learn what you can from those who know what they are doing.

    Better than watching YouTube videos, I like to go on a league night and just watch people bowl. I find the best bowlers, and study their walk, their swing, and their style. I may even ask them questions when they are done, trying to determine why they did something a certain way and if I can apply it myself.

    Thank you very much for the tips!

    What are some of the things you mentioned that you do not need to be at a bowling alley for?
    These drills are easier to demonstrate than explain so I will give you some suggestions as to what to search for on the internet as I go.
    First you can practice a release drill. Norm Duke has an excellent video of how to do this filmed at a bowling alley, however you can easily do it at home. Being older than you, I use either a yoga block or some sort of cushion under the knee that’s on the floor and roll the ball into a pillow or cushion under the mirror on the back of the bed room door. This drill is actually better at home for people who are learning to hook the ball since at the alley you will be paying to watch your ball hook halfway down and roll off into the gutter.
    You can practice your swing. If you go to eileen’sbowlingbuddy.com you can find training videos fo their swing trainers, and you can probably figure out a way to make do with stuff you already own.
    If you have wood or vinyl floors in your home you can practice your approach assuming there is enough room.
    John

  7. #17
    High Roller
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Connecticut
    Posts
    2,920
    Chats: 13

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by J Daisy View Post
    What is your opinion? Should I learn to hook now, or work on my aim bowling straight first?
    The way bowling has evolved on the typical house shot, usually just called THS, accuracy is less important than getting the ball into the pocket at a good angle. The THS gives people who hook the ball a fairly big area to hit at the breakpoint and still hit the pocket. Throwing it straight you get no advantage from the THS and even if you were to release you ball from right next to the gutter at the foul line you would only have about half of the optimum angle at the pins. Eventually you need to hook the ball

    In regards to being accurate, you must remember that it is not about hitting you target at the arrows. It is all about playing the right line. If I drift a board left with my feet and hit my mark, I’ll miss the breakpoint two or three boards right. If I drift one left and miss one left at the arrows I only miss one left at the breakpoint.

    I think that if you’re hitting the pins within two boards 90% of the time you’re ready to start on hooking the ball, preferably with an entry level reactive ball.
    John

  8. #18
    Pin Crusher Phonetek's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2018
    Location
    West Suburbs of Chicago, Illinois
    Posts
    1,300
    Chats: 0

    Default

    You said you have your approach "down pat"? Let me start by saying that you NEVER have it down pat. You may have your basic style repeatable but it will be always something that will need tweaking over the years. I uploaded a video here last year for critique and let me say that if I uploaded on today you'd would swear it's not the same person. Not because I cut my hair off either. The very basic mechanics of my approach are similar to what I've done for 42 years now, but a trained coach would definitely be able to spot everything I have done and know why I did it. An untrained eye would see only the drastic changes.

    You're style is unique to you, a coach will help you refine it to make it work. As a beginner, that should be your primary focus. How your ball spins, what ball you use (as long as it's drilled for you and proper weight) and what pins you knock down are irrelevant at this stage in your development. Like the old adage, "Learn to walk before you learn to run". It's clear you can't get a coach right now. In the interim may I suggest you watch "How to" videos from the pros to learn the basics. There are several volumes online available, many for free. Get yourself a cheap tripod for your cell phone or tablet and record yourself on the lanes. Do it from several angles. Upload videos here for critique. Watch those videos yourself, play them in slow motion and see if you can identify things you are doing wrong. Others here will point out the rest.

    Practice, practice and more practice! You can do it in your own living room or kitchen. Sounds ridiculous but it's true. Most of all, don't get frustrated. I'm trying to instill that into my son. I told him just last night, you don't know enough yet to justify getting frustrated. Right now, everything is just a guessing game with him on where to stand, what to target. Once he learns the proper way of doing that and he don't do it....THEN he can get frustrated. Right now the most important thing is patience and learning those things and ignoring the score monitor.
    Bowling Center Employee (Assistant Manager, Counter, Bartender and AMF Pinsetter Mechanic)
    Arsenal only consists of 3 balls currently "15# Hammer Rip'd (Sport Only)" & Faball Original Black Hammer (Spare Ball / Main THS) Venom Shock & 20+yr old Linds worth a mention
    Currently 535+ Rev Rate @ 19 MPH

  9. #19

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by J Anderson View Post
    These drills are easier to demonstrate than explain so I will give you some suggestions as to what to search for on the internet as I go.
    First you can practice a release drill. Norm Duke has an excellent video of how to do this filmed at a bowling alley, however you can easily do it at home. Being older than you, I use either a yoga block or some sort of cushion under the knee that’s on the floor and roll the ball into a pillow or cushion under the mirror on the back of the bed room door. This drill is actually better at home for people who are learning to hook the ball since at the alley you will be paying to watch your ball hook halfway down and roll off into the gutter.
    You can practice your swing. If you go to eileen’sbowlingbuddy.com you can find training videos fo their swing trainers, and you can probably figure out a way to make do with stuff you already own.
    If you have wood or vinyl floors in your home you can practice your approach assuming there is enough room.
    Thank you so much for these tips! I will look up those videos for sure when I have more time. I really appreciate the help. :-)

  10. #20

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by J Anderson View Post
    The way bowling has evolved on the typical house shot, usually just called THS, accuracy is less important than getting the ball into the pocket at a good angle. The THS gives people who hook the ball a fairly big area to hit at the breakpoint and still hit the pocket. Throwing it straight you get no advantage from the THS and even if you were to release you ball from right next to the gutter at the foul line you would only have about half of the optimum angle at the pins. Eventually you need to hook the ball

    In regards to being accurate, you must remember that it is not about hitting you target at the arrows. It is all about playing the right line. If I drift a board left with my feet and hit my mark, I’ll miss the breakpoint two or three boards right. If I drift one left and miss one left at the arrows I only miss one left at the breakpoint.

    I think that if you’re hitting the pins within two boards 90% of the time you’re ready to start on hooking the ball, preferably with an entry level reactive ball.
    Thank you for all your help. That sounds like good advice. I would say that I hit within 2 boards of my mark about 60% of the time when I'm actually able to focus on the game, so I need to keep working on that. Like I've said elsewhere, I'm not very good at this point, haha.

    I will be keeping my eye out for a good reactive resin hooking ball for myself in the future.

Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 123 LastLast

Tags for this Thread

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •