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Thread: Question about resurfacing plastic balls?????

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    Pin Crusher Hammer's Avatar
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    Default Question about resurfacing plastic balls?????

    I know about resurfacing reactive and urethane balls but not plastic balls. I bought a Columbia Lava ball in May. I guess eventually plastic balls have to get resurfaced. My question is how do you surface a plastic and what grits do you use? What grits will get a plastic back to OOB level? After you surface it do you need a polish to let it skid more? So if anyone here surfaced a plastic I would like to know so I can get mine done right. It has quite a few games on it between two leagues and 4 game practices every Wednesday.
    Arsenal: Columbia 300 Yellow Dot Bleeder Plastic Ball and Columbia 300 Lava Ball Plastic
    Can't use aggressive balls because of bad knees and no approach. Bowling for 36 years.

  2. #2
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    Quote Originally Posted by Hammer View Post
    I know about resurfacing reactive and urethane balls but not plastic balls. I bought a Columbia Lava ball in May. I guess eventually plastic balls have to get resurfaced. My question is how do you surface a plastic and what grits do you use? What grits will get a plastic back to OOB level? After you surface it do you need a polish to let it skid more? So if anyone here surfaced a plastic I would like to know so I can get mine done right. It has quite a few games on it between two leagues and 4 game practices every Wednesday.
    Sanding a Polyester (Plastic) ball is not particularly any different than sanding any other ball, other than it takes a little longer to do because the material is harder than other balls.

    You use the same grits, typically you don't skip grits though since plastic balls usually have a "Polished" O.O.B. So you want to do each individual step so you have the smoothest surface.

    As for what grit you start with, that would all depend on how bad the balls surface is. If it's dinged and scratched up real bad, then you'd start with a course grit, If not then start with a finer grit.

    As for using polish, it's all personal preference. Some like a little sheen, some want it to shine like a marble and polish away, if you don't want to use polish you can have a good shine using nothing but pad/paper.

    Right handed Stroker, high track ,about 13 degree axis tilt. PAP is located 5 9/16” over 1 3/4” up.Speed ave. about 14 mph at the pins. Medium rev’s.High Game 300, High series 798

    "Adjust too soon and maybe ruin one frame, adjust too late and ruin a game."

  3. #3

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    Several years ago Wendy Macpherson suggested that it helps to keep some surface on plastic spare balls to keep them from skidding too much as you go cross lane at corner spares. I always keep a 4000 surface on my spare ball, and I pick up somewhere over 98% of my single pin spares.

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    98% is pretty amazing, I personally believe WRW’s 2005-2006 475/475 record on single pins is the most amazing bowling stat of all

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