View Poll Results: How often should you replace your interchangable bowling shoe sliding soles?

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  • Every 288 games (12 games x 4 days) x 6months))

    1 33.33%
  • Every 504 games (12 games x 7 days) x 6months))

    0 0%
  • When it becomes visually discolored?

    0 0%
  • When I begin compensating my soles with easy slide?

    2 66.67%
Multiple Choice Poll.
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Thread: "To Slide or not to slide...that is the ?"

  1. #1

    Default "To Slide or not to slide...that is the ?"

    Hello fellow bowlers of the world. I am hoping to recieve a detailed explanation on the sliding approach versus the plant approach shots. I want to create more rev rate and higher backend motion to the pins. Which way will allow me to do thiat efficiently and consistently? How should I prepare myself physically to endure the changes? What are the benefits to planting versus sliding?

    Thank you very much for reading the post and answering the poll. As you can see by my poll, I am baffled on myown theory on simplifying my game.


    Happy Martin Luther King J.R. Day
    Last edited by rastamaoli; 01-17-2011 at 04:08 PM.

  2. #2
    Bowler
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    to slide would mean to me....bowling into your senior years. i'm 65 and if i didn't slide,my kness and back would be a sore mess. yesterday during a rain we had and we were bowling,i started to stick at the line (which is devistating to my game). i had to start planting my slide foot for about a game and a half (before i was able to slide again) and my knees and back started to tighten up and become sore. to me,that is one of the reasons to slide and i still get the speed ,hook and roll. i guess you would call it longevity?

  3. #3
    Step into my office


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    I agree with Tracy. For many years I planted instead of sliding, because being a high rev player wanted that extra leverage you get from planting. However, the knee and leg pain that will rear its nasty head isn't worth it at all. Throw the ball a little straighter and slide. Work on being accurate and make spares. That's why they make bowling balls that are so aggressive now, so you don't have to do all of the work.

  4. #4
    Ringer DanielMareina's Avatar
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    I will not rock the boat. I bowl in a wood lane and wood approach center. I bowled in street shoes for years to get the rev rate and lift on the ball. Every year when I go to nationals (synthetic approaches) my knee would light on fire. I have since started using bowling shoes and have seen an average increase of about 15 pins. My knees don't bother me and I get under the ball becuase of my increased knee bend while sliding. I was a huge advocate for not sliding for years, but now I see the benefits in it, and recommend sliding to all of my students.
    Daniel Mareina
    Storm Staff Member
    Bowling Center Manager/Pro Shop Operator/Bowling Coach

  5. #5
    SandBagger WAC4504's Avatar
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    Once again no need to rock the boat, I find that bending at the knees and getting low makes all the difference in my game.I used to have a more bend over/upright approach with very little to slide, and found that my knees were hurting all the time. But by getting low,and sliding to a stop with my back straight, I'v increased my speed, revs, accuracy, and I'm able to stay behind the ball now. Your choice, but I vote slide.
    Good luck and good bowling
    Bill

  6. #6

    Default

    Why thank you for all of the respectful and well educated and experienced bowlers out there. I recently worked on my game and I have commited myself to a higher backswing creating arc and allowing gravity to take its course. By doing this, it allows me more foward momentum to actually slide and target specifically the shot a lot easier.

    Have a great new season and good bowling to all

    ALOHA from Hawaii

  7. #7

    Default Stick n' Rip.

    "Not to slide"!.

    I'm 26 years old, and I have never had anything remotely close to a slide. Depending on how fluid your release is, you can also avoid putting excessive stress on your knees, hips, back and wrist. I'm a cranker, 215 average on wood / generally 225 on syn., and throw the ball around 17-18mph (18-5 preferred line, high axis tilt, high revs).

    Equipment wise, I bought a pair of Dexter SST 4 SE (black/gold). I then purchased a T1 Slide Sole (Rubber Traction) and removed the stock S8 slide pad on the slide foot (I'm right-handed). I cut the T1 sole to match my slide foot, and use the H1 Ultra Brakkz Heel as well. This gives me absolutely no slide. When my foot stops, my ball is already on the downswing though. Most stress comes from the bowlers that are literally stopping at the line at the peak of their backswing, which is putting a large amount of stress on the entire slide-foot side of the body (90% of it impacting the knee).

    TL/DR: I prefer no-slide because I've tuned my game towards this style. I took appropriate measures to gain comfort and consistency. It's all in what you are comfortable with.

  8. #8
    Ringer DanielMareina's Avatar
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    Everyone is entitled to their opinion, but just as a point of clarity, Most bowlers that bowl with no slide stop a mere second before the release point. They do not usually stop at the top of their backswing as the above person said. The reason it causes knee pain is because you have a heavy weight and your forward body movement causing forward momentum, and you are stopping all of that momentum flat footed with one leg. Some people don't experience knee pain, or they change their game around it, but you don't see a lot of bowlers in the hall of fame that don't slide. It will improve most peoples game to be able to slide and get a good knee bend during that slide.
    Daniel Mareina
    Storm Staff Member
    Bowling Center Manager/Pro Shop Operator/Bowling Coach

  9. #9

    Default

    I absolutely agree with you, but I do know of many bowlers that actually stop at the peak of the backswing/begginning-middle of the downswing. These are in-fact the majority of the bowlers with knee problems, which is often evident by the knee-brace. Again, many game factors such as loft/laying the ball down, speed of approach/release/arm swing, etc. will all play factors in your over-all game and well-being. Just use common sense when changing your game, or beginning your game.

    If something is easily duplicated (consistency), and is comfortable to you, stick with it. The game of bowling was best put by some of the greats of the past. "Straighter is greater. The simpler the better.".

    We all get a laugh out of the "house bowler" that is always walking around angry, blaming the lanes/oil, claiming that they've come to the point where they're "splitting boards" when adjusting. All the while, the 65 year old man 1 lane over is throwing the ball off of the corner using a Sumo and throwing a 720.

    Keep it simple.

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